Calibrations: The More the Merrier?

Actually, more isn’t necessarily better but none is not an option either.

Calibration curves are used to actually determine concentrations of compounds of interest in your samples.This idea being that the lowest and highest unknown concentrations are bracketed by at least 2 standard concentrations from your standard curve. https://terpconnect.umd.edu/~toh/models/CalibrationCurve.html  If a unknown is outside you calibration range, then you need to redo, to bracket that concentration in your curve, as long as the curve is still linear. If the curve cannot be increased, then dilutions are needed to bring the unknown concentration in the calibration range.

One can talk about the time interval between calibrations  (weekly, monthly, etc.). This interval depends on how complex or dirty the samples are. If degradation of the separation is occurring, then a calibration is warranted. EPA test methods, in particular, say what the recommended calibration interval is. Also, if the column is removed for any reason, then a calibration is warranted.

Also, there is the use of duplicate samples, calibration check samples, and spiked samples that can be used during a run. These samples are to access the viability of the calibration curve.  All of these should be used to some extent.

There is quite a bit of information in this post. The point is, one should not ignore these points because they are hard or make analysis more complicated. These should be used to better the analysis.

David Slomczynski, Ph.D; GeoMetrick Enterprises

 

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